Useful resources related to salvaging waterlogged paper collections include:

 

Salvaging waterlogged collections from the State Library of Queensland

http://www.slq.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/128984/SLQ_-_Salvaging_water_damaged_collections_-_Nov_08.pdf

 
Conservation TipConservation Tip No. 6: Dealing with wet records from the State Records Office New South Wales

http://archivesoutside.records.nsw.gov.au/conservation-tip-no-6-dea...

 

and 

 

Drying a wet book from the State Library of NSW

http://www.sl.nsw.gov.au/about/collections/preservation/drying_wet_...

Views: 541

Attachments:

Replies to This Discussion

The State Library of Queensland has distributed the following Media Release related to Salvage of precious memorabilia...

6 January 2011

Flood victims urged to put documents on ice



Flood victims worried about what to do with precious memorabilia damaged by floodwaters should look to the power of the family freezer to help retain their keepsakes.


The State Library of Queensland is urging the state’s flood affected residents and business owners to consider taking some simple steps before reluctantly having to throw out damaged photographs, books, paper records and other audio-visual collections.


State Library Manager of Collection Preservation Grant Collins said the key to salvaging as many items as possible is “don’t panic” and prioritise those items which items are the most significant to you, and tend to them first.


“It can be an emotional time, and people may throw out cherished and irreplaceable possessions damaged by water because of the initial overwhelming visual of the damage they witness to their business or dwelling,” Mr Collins said.


“However, in some cases they can be saved by washing of with clean water, contaminates such as mud and silt and implementing a drying regime”


A Salvaging Water Damaged Collections fact sheet offers simple, home based solutions for preserving books, documents, photographs, films, tapes, and digital media.


“In many cases all that’s required is a kitchen table, pedestal fan, some absorbent paper, a clothesline and following the basic process in the fact sheet,” Mr Collins said.


“It’s important to prioritise based on deterioration time. We recommend people start with photographs and film, and move on to any paper documents and digital media.”


“Paper documents can be held over for recovery just by popping them into a freezer bag and then into a freezer. This needs to occur quickly as mould can grow on collections within 48 hours of them becoming damp or subjected to high relative humidity. Freezing is the best way to buy time particularly when you are endeavouring to get your own house in order as it reduces the risk of mould outbreak and allows for salvage to occur at a later time,” he said.


“The key to recovering most of these documents is to get them dry by pegging film and paper based items carefully on an internal clothesline or laying out on paper towels on tables with pedestal fans running and creating and area of increased ventilation as an effective means of drying collections out.”


Other tips include drying bound material by interleaving with paper towels every 5% of the text pages to remove excess dampness followed by standing on their bottom edge and fan pages to allow pedestal fans to ventilate and dry the pages. This may take several days.


Advice on how to rescue water damaged collections can be found on the State Library of Queensland’s Preservation webpage www.slq.qld.gov.au/services/pres/advice. Badly damaged precious items may require professional conservation treatment.


The Collection Preservation staff offer advice to organisations and community members, they can be contacted by email conservation@slq.qld.gov.au.

Fact Sheet
http://www.slq.qld.gov.au/services/pres/advice

Media inquiries
Nathan Campbell, Marketing and Communications, State Library of Queensland
T 07 3842 9847 E nathan.campbell@slq.qld.gov.au

Posted by Tegan Anthes, Preservation Australia 14 Jan

I have outlined below some simple steps for recovery of photographic prints, negs etc. I have also attached it as a word document for those that can print it out.

Disaster salvage of water damaged Photographic prints and negatives.

Steps to follow:

Act as soon as possible to prevent mould damage
Wet prints are fragile and can tear - provide support on non-image side.

If prints are still wet -
Remove dirt and dirty water with clean cold water.
(Take care as image layer may be fragile and vigorous washing could cause damage.)

Separate prints from stacks and lay out on clean paper towel – image side up.
Prints will buckle slightly as they dry

(Do not allow prints to dry in a stack as they may become permanently blocked together)

If quantity does not allow for recovery immediately – FREEZE.
Clean prints as above before freezing.
Place into bags to freeze
No need to separate before freezing
Can be frozen in home or commercial freezers
Once frozen call a conservator

If prints are dry and stuck together – call a conservator.

Preservation Australia 1300 651 408


For more detailed information go to -
http://www.imagepermanenceinstitute.org/shtml_sub/waterdamage.pdf

Glass-plate negatives, daguerreotypes, ambrotypes and tintypes
Do not freeze
Do not immerse in water
Do not freeze dry or vacuum dry

Separate from other types of photographs
Separate each item
Air-dry immediately by laying out on blotter with gentle air flow, emulsion side up (matt side)

Disaster%20salvage%20of%20water%20damaged%20Photographic%20prints%2...

 

Posted by Jackie Bettington on Jan 19
Vice President
Australian Society of Archivists Inc.

For support and advice on disaster management, including dealing with flood or fire damaged records, please go to the Joint ASA and RIM Professionals Australasia Statement at: http://www.archivists.org.au/news/id/27 and Blue Shield Australia at: http://www.blueshieldaustralia.org.au/

Jackie Bettington
Vice President
Australian Society of Archivists Inc.
www.archivists.org.au
0432 150 446

Badly damaged precious items may require professional conservation treatment. The Australian Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Materials’, the professional body for the conservation profession has details of private conservators on their website (http://www.aiccm.org.au/), along with links to more useful information on saving water damaged collections. These include

Salvaging water-damaged belongings

PDF Print E-mail

Click on the titles below to view salvage information for damaged collections. Links will open in a new window.

How do I salvage flood-damaged records? (National Archives of Australia)

Salvaging water-damaged collections (State Library of Queensland - PDF document, 65KB)

Recovering audio-visual treasures from flood damage - National Film & Sound Archive

Message posted to Australian Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Material (AICCM) list

--- Original Message ---
Date: 1/23/2011
From: "AICCM" <secretariat@aiccm.org.au>
Subject: Recent Disaster Recovery at the State Library of Queensland

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE FOR THE CONSERVATION OF CULTURAL MATERIAL INC

ABN 60209816117

LIBRARIANS REWRITE THE BOOK ON DISASTER RECOVERY

When flood waters threatened to breach the banks of the Brisbane River last Wednesday, the State Library of Queensland looked to be one of its first casualties. Fortunately for the library and Queensland's bookworms, management had a well- developed disaster recovery plan that went beyond simple data backup and that included all the minutiae of surviving catastrophe so that librarians didn't have to make it up as they went along.

Please read attached document for details of how the library successfully responded to the floods.



Box 1638 Canberra, ACT 2601 AUSTRALIA www.aiccm.org.au
T: +61 (0)3 9013 0933 * F: +61 (0)3 9311 3450 * E: secretariat@aiccm.org.au

Attachments:

Queensland State Archives have recently added some useful resources related to salvaging water damaged paper based records at the following address:  http://www.archives.qld.gov.au/flood/default.asp

It includes 

Queensland State Archives

PO Box 1397, Sunnybank Hills Qld 4109
T: (07) 3131 7777   F: (07) 3131 7765    E: info@archives.qld.gov.au    W: www.archives.qld.gov.au

Recovering audiovisual treasures from flood damage 

 National Film & Sound Archive

http://www.nfsa.gov.au/blog/2011/01/10/recovering-audiovisual-floods/

As flood waters and TC Yasi devastate towns in Queensland and Western Australia, the NFSA has prepared advice on how to save precious audiovisual material. Film and tape is very susceptible to damage from water, especially when contaminated with dirt and debris. Each type of object is affected in a slightly different way and requires a slightly different approach in preventing further damage. In all cases, the sooner you can start recovering the objects, the greater chance of minimising damage. The NFSA can assist by providing information on the best ways to salvage your flood damaged objects and give these precious objects the best chance of recovery. ( continued on NFSA website)

Message posted to Libman, cls, ind, local studies by State Library of Qld February 9th 2011

 

Colleagues

 

The last two months have been an extraordinary time in Queensland – a time for seeing the impact of natural disasters on our communities – and remembering past floods and cyclones.  It has also been a time when much of our history has been at risk – everything from family bibles, photograph albums and super 8 footage. 

Collection preservation staff have compiled the following fact sheets that provide expert advice and practical solutions for dealing with damaged Collections. This information maybe helpful for you, clients and community organisations – the important message is that things can be saved – in many cases all that’s required is a fan, some absorbent paper, a clothesline and a little care.   Please distribute as widely as possible.  

The Collection Preservation team offer advice to organisations and community members, they can be contacted by email conservation@slq.qld.gov.au.  Further updates will be provided at this page on our website.  http://www.slq.qld.gov.au/services/pres/advice

Thank you and look forward to sharing stories over the coming months.  

 

Louise Denoon | Executive Manager | Heritage Collections

State Library of Queensland | PO Box 3488 | South Brisbane 4101 

t: + 61 7 3842 9438 | f: + 61 7 3842 9126 | e: louise.denoon@slq.qld.gov.au | www.slq.qld.gov.au

 



Q-DIS said:

The State Library of Queensland has distributed the following Media Release related to Salvage of precious memorabilia...

6 January 2011

Flood victims urged to put documents on ice



Flood victims worried about what to do with precious memorabilia damaged by floodwaters should look to the power of the family freezer to help retain their keepsakes.


The State Library of Queensland is urging the state’s flood affected residents and business owners to consider taking some simple steps before reluctantly having to throw out damaged photographs, books, paper records and other audio-visual collections.


State Library Manager of Collection Preservation Grant Collins said the key to salvaging as many items as possible is “don’t panic” and prioritise those items which items are the most significant to you, and tend to them first.


“It can be an emotional time, and people may throw out cherished and irreplaceable possessions damaged by water because of the initial overwhelming visual of the damage they witness to their business or dwelling,” Mr Collins said.


“However, in some cases they can be saved by washing of with clean water, contaminates such as mud and silt and implementing a drying regime”


A Salvaging Water Damaged Collections fact sheet offers simple, home based solutions for preserving books, documents, photographs, films, tapes, and digital media.


“In many cases all that’s required is a kitchen table, pedestal fan, some absorbent paper, a clothesline and following the basic process in the fact sheet,” Mr Collins said.


“It’s important to prioritise based on deterioration time. We recommend people start with photographs and film, and move on to any paper documents and digital media.”


“Paper documents can be held over for recovery just by popping them into a freezer bag and then into a freezer. This needs to occur quickly as mould can grow on collections within 48 hours of them becoming damp or subjected to high relative humidity. Freezing is the best way to buy time particularly when you are endeavouring to get your own house in order as it reduces the risk of mould outbreak and allows for salvage to occur at a later time,” he said.


“The key to recovering most of these documents is to get them dry by pegging film and paper based items carefully on an internal clothesline or laying out on paper towels on tables with pedestal fans running and creating and area of increased ventilation as an effective means of drying collections out.”


Other tips include drying bound material by interleaving with paper towels every 5% of the text pages to remove excess dampness followed by standing on their bottom edge and fan pages to allow pedestal fans to ventilate and dry the pages. This may take several days.


Advice on how to rescue water damaged collections can be found on the State Library of Queensland’s Preservation webpage www.slq.qld.gov.au/services/pres/advice. Badly damaged precious items may require professional conservation treatment.


The Collection Preservation staff offer advice to organisations and community members, they can be contacted by email conservation@slq.qld.gov.au.

Fact Sheet
http://www.slq.qld.gov.au/services/pres/advice

Media inquiries
Nathan Campbell, Marketing and Communications, State Library of Queensland
T 07 3842 9847 E nathan.campbell@slq.qld.gov.au

Preservation Australia has also posted a video on youtube to assist in the Salvage of Water damaged books at
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDpQake9_IE

Ann Baillie said:

Posted by Tegan Anthes, Preservation Australia 14 Jan

I have outlined below some simple steps for recovery of photographic prints, negs etc. I have also attached it as a word document for those that can print it out.

Disaster salvage of water damaged Photographic prints and negatives.

Steps to follow:

Act as soon as possible to prevent mould damage
Wet prints are fragile and can tear - provide support on non-image side.

If prints are still wet -
Remove dirt and dirty water with clean cold water.
(Take care as image layer may be fragile and vigorous washing could cause damage.)

Separate prints from stacks and lay out on clean paper towel – image side up.
Prints will buckle slightly as they dry

(Do not allow prints to dry in a stack as they may become permanently blocked together)

If quantity does not allow for recovery immediately – FREEZE.
Clean prints as above before freezing.
Place into bags to freeze
No need to separate before freezing
Can be frozen in home or commercial freezers
Once frozen call a conservator

If prints are dry and stuck together – call a conservator.

Preservation Australia 1300 651 408


For more detailed information go to -
http://www.imagepermanenceinstitute.org/shtml_sub/waterdamage.pdf

Glass-plate negatives, daguerreotypes, ambrotypes and tintypes
Do not freeze
Do not immerse in water
Do not freeze dry or vacuum dry

Separate from other types of photographs
Separate each item
Air-dry immediately by laying out on blotter with gentle air flow, emulsion side up (matt side)

Disaster%20salvage%20of%20water%20damaged%20Photographic%20prints%2...

 

The Australian Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Material (AICCM) Inc has prepared a brochure 'How can you salvage precious belongings after a flood' which is relevant whether the water damage is due to flooding or a cyclone. It can be downloaded from:

http://www.aiccm.org.au/docs/AICCM_Brochures/AfterAFlood_Ver5.PDF

Please feel free to print, copy and distribute AICCM fliers to whomever may benefit from this information.

Ann Baillie said:

Badly damaged precious items may require professional conservation treatment. The Australian Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Materials’, the professional body for the conservation profession has details of private conservators on their website (http://www.aiccm.org.au/), along with links to more useful information on saving water damaged collections. These include

Salvaging water-damaged belongings

PDF Print E-mail

Click on the titles below to view salvage information for damaged collections. Links will open in a new window.

How do I salvage flood-damaged records? (National Archives of Australia)

Salvaging water-damaged collections (State Library of Queensland - PDF document, 65KB)

Recovering audio-visual treasures from flood damage - National Film & Sound Archive

Attachments:

 
National Archives of Australia have information on Recovering flood-damaged records at
www.naa.gov.au/records-management/secure-and-store/secure/business-...

from the State Library of Qld........

 

Disaster recovery resources

One of the newest pages on the SLQ website is aimed at helping people through difficult times of disaster recovery. The page at www.slq.qld.gov.au/info/com/disasters  includes links to collection material, databases, articles and websites that give information and support to people dealing with the physical, financial and psychological effects of the aftermath. It also lists details of books in the collection which clients can access when the building reopens to the public tomorrow (Wednesday 16 February).

Q-DIS said:

The State Library of Queensland has distributed the following Media Release related to Salvage of precious memorabilia...

6 January 2011

Flood victims urged to put documents on ice



Flood victims worried about what to do with precious memorabilia damaged by floodwaters should look to the power of the family freezer to help retain their keepsakes.


The State Library of Queensland is urging the state’s flood affected residents and business owners to consider taking some simple steps before reluctantly having to throw out damaged photographs, books, paper records and other audio-visual collections.


State Library of Collection Preservation Grant Collins said the key to salvaging as many items as possible is “don’t panic” and prioritise those items which items are the most significant to you, and tend to them first.


“It can be an emotional time, and people may throw out cherished and irreplaceable possessions damaged by water because of the initial overwhelming visual of the damage they witness to their business or dwelling,” Mr Collins said.


“However, in some cases they can be saved by washing of with clean water, contaminates such as mud and silt and implementing a drying regime”


A Salvaging Water Damaged Collections fact sheet offers simple, home based solutions for preserving books, documents, photographs, films, tapes, and digital media.


“In many cases all that’s required is a kitchen table, pedestal fan, some absorbent paper, a clothesline and following the basic process in the fact sheet,” Mr Collins said.


“It’s important to prioritise based on deterioration time. We recommend people start with photographs and film, and move on to any paper documents and digital media.”


“Paper documents can be held over for recovery just by popping them into a freezer bag and then into a freezer. This needs to occur quickly as mould can grow on collections within 48 hours of them becoming damp or subjected to high relative humidity. Freezing is the best way to buy time particularly when you are endeavouring to get your own house in order as it reduces the risk of mould outbreak and allows for salvage to occur at a later time,” he said.


“The key to recovering most of these documents is to get them dry by pegging film and paper based items carefully on an internal clothesline or laying out on paper towels on tables with pedestal fans running and creating and area of increased ventilation as an effective means of drying collections out.”


Other tips include drying bound material by interleaving with paper towels every 5% of the text pages to remove excess dampness followed by standing on their bottom edge and fan pages to allow pedestal fans to ventilate and dry the pages. This may take several days.


Advice on how to rescue water damaged collections can be found on the State Library of Queensland’s Preservation webpage www.slq.qld.gov.au/services/pres/advice. Badly damaged precious items may require professional conservation treatment.


The Collection Preservation staff offer advice to organisations and community members, they can be contacted by email conservation@slq.qld.gov.au.

Fact Sheet
http://www.slq.qld.gov.au/services/pres/advice

Media inquiries
Nathan Campbell, Marketing and Communications, State Library of Queensland
T 07 3842 9847 E nathan.campbell@slq.qld.gov.au

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